Category Archives: Marketing

How to improve your marketing ROI

How to improve your marketing ROI

Download the article collection by Epicor’s former International VP of Marketing

Our new collection of guest articles explores the stresses and strains of modern marketing, and how to improve your marketing ROI, consistently and systematically.

Make your own luck image

Make your own luck

Each article offers a new angle, and a potential solution for marketing teams looking for a way to improve the ROI on marketing without the risk.

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GDPR is coming

GDPR is coming

What you really need to know before 25th May.

You need to have been living under a rock to not realise that the GDPR is coming.  The hype is growing – you could be fined up to 4% of your turnover or up to £20 million. 

But what does it really mean for you?

 

 

Here are nine things that you absolutely need to know:

 

1.    If you hold any personal data, you must be registered with the ICO

This is the Information Commissioner’s Office, an independent authority that promotes information rights in the public interest. Don’t delay, visit the ico.org.uk and register.

 

2.    B2B data isn’t exempt from the GDPR

Under the Data Protection Act B2B data was largely exempt from the rules that governed personal data.

This isn’t the case with the GDPR – an email address that can be attached to a specific person such as jo.bloggs@company.co.uk is personal data.  As such you’ll need to make sure you have a legal basis for storing and using the data.

 

3.    You must have a legal basis for storing & using data

For many people this will be one of the following:

  • Contract – you’re holding the data because you have a contract with that person – i.e. they’re a customer.
  • Consent – you’re holding the data because you have received explicit consent to hold & use it – i.e. your marketing campaigns have explicitly asked for opt-in to communications.
  • Legitimate Interests – you have a relationship with this person which allows you to store their data, this may be customer or membership data.

There are 3 others: 1. necessary for compliance with a legal obligation; 2. vital interests; and 3. public interests.  These are less likely to be relevant unless you process things like financial records.

 

4.    If you’re using consent as your legal basis…

It must be freely given, unambiguous & given with an affirmative action.

Pre-ticked boxes, silence, or no activity don’t constitute consent.  If you’ve used any of these in the past, you need to find another legal basis for holding and using the data.  Or you need to get consent from those you’re holding data for and emailing.

Remember, existing data must be GDPR compliant from the 25th May.  If it doesn’t comply with the rules you can’t use it.  So if you do need to get anyone on your database to consent to you holding and using their data, then you need to do it before 25th May!

You must record the fact that consent has been given on your database

Not only this, you need to log when that consent was given, and what wording was used to get that consent.

 

5.    Data profiling is now included in the GDPR

Previously you didn’t need to inform people that you would be profiling their data e.g. using geodemographic data to segment personal records, directing offers based on previous marketing behaviour.

Now, whilst you don’t need explicit consent to profile data, you do need to make sure that those on your database are notified and told that they have a right to object.  This is best done through your privacy policy.

 

6.    Legitimate Interests & Direct Marketing

Recital 47 outlines that processing of personal data for direct marketing purposes may be regarded as carried out for a legitimate interest.  This should cover you with existing customers or donors, particularly if you hold their data because of a contract.

However, you shouldn’t assume that this covers your prospects – you need to think “would this person reasonably expect me to hold this data and send them communications”.  If the answer is “no”, then don’t do it as it won’t be covered by Legitimate Interests.

 

7.    Are you someone who handles data on behalf of someone else (a Data Processor)? You’re liable under the GDPR

Under the GDPR, the data processor now shares the liability for compensating for damages in the event of a breach.  They will also need to prove data protection compliance.

Any Data Processor (and don’t forget that’s anyone who stores the data as well as the people who use it) needs to have a contract with the Data Controller that outlines their responsibilities and liabilities.

The Data Controller can’t use any Data Processor unless they can provide ‘sufficient guarantees’ that the requirements of the GDPR will be met and the rights of data subjects protected.

 

8.    Make sure you’re clear as to what you will be doing with the data in your Privacy Policy

This is the main communication vehicle to tell people what data you’ll be collecting, why you’re collecting it, and what you’ll use it for.  Make sure you’ve got everything covered through this, and that includes if you’re likely to profile data.  If you’re using cookies on your website, you’ll need to include a policy on this too as these are considered as collecting & keeping personal data.

 

9.    You may be OK under the GDPR, but don’t forget PECR

The Privacy & Electronic Communication Regulation layers on top of the GDPR.  This stipulates that you must have consent before you market to someone via email, mobile or text, unless they fall under the exception rules which are:

  1. you obtained an individual’s personal data in the course of a sale or negotiations for a sale of a product or service;
  2. the communications you send are only marketing similar products or services; and
  3. the individual was provided with a simple opportunity to refuse marketing when their details were collected, and if they didn’t opt out at this point, they are given a simple way to do so in all future marketing communications
We hope this has helped solve some of your questions on what the GDPR means for you.

On 24th April we ran an interactive workshop designed to demystify the GDPR, and arm organisations with the tools they need to prepare for it.

If you’re still feeling unsure about the GDPR and how it effects your organisation, get in touch and we’ll arrange a call to help you become data compliant by May 25th.

 

Creative. It’s good thinking.

Creative. It’s good thinking.

Cannes Lions, touted as the “Oscars” of the marketing industry, is a real showcase for the sort of work every agency would love to do.

Creative catwalk trends However, like a fashion-show, it touts the sort of work that – in the real world – not every business or charity would wear. A lack of budget is the most common complaint (or balls, some would say).

The reality is that clever ideas, and clever use of media, don’t need to cost the earth.

What’s needed, instead, is an understanding that unless an organisation embraces the type of creative solution that makes people think something different, they will never do anything different.

And that – in our view – is the essence of marketing.

 

From Cannes to the DMA Awards 2017 – a sense of social purpose

Notable in all the creative awards from 2017 was creative work eschewing the more obviously commercially minded work released over the year, in favour of campaigns or projects that showed social purpose or included a higher aim than ‘mere’ selling.

OK. If you’re an out and out fundraiser this work might seem esoteric at best, and wasteful at worst. But increasingly, agencies are keeping social issues in the public eye. And this can’t be a bad thing.

It’s not only at Cannes that a social conscience has won out.

The 2017 DMA Grand Prix went to The British Army’s “This is Belonging” campaign. The combination of impactful film, with beautifully crafted copy, brings this to life

A sense of belonging may sound like a small thing. Yet it fuels you as much as food and water, because it doesn’t just feed your body, it feeds your mind and soul.

The stronger the sense of belonging – the stronger you become.

Sure, you could look for belonging in a football team or club, but the sense of belonging you’ll find in the Army – well, that’s the next level.

The less cynical amongst marketing teams will appreciate that creative brains are trying to do ‘better’. And in each of the following instances, all winners at Cannes 2017, they do.

Public safety with a twist

First off the block is a film showing how the human race might evolve to survive car crashes. A familiar public safety brief with a twist: showing the ugly new breed of survivors.

Ad creative: Public safety campaign: evolution to allow humans to survive car crashes

 

Making it personal

In Finland a bank wanted to show the effect of every financial transaction you make.

A very poignant topic as the Baltic Sea around its shores is severely polluted.

The Finnish bank Ålandsbanken’s biologically degradable credit card not only lets users see the average carbon footprint of their consumption, it also gives them the option to make up for the footprint of their purchases.

“The sea is never far away when you are based in the Åland islands, and we can’t avoid seeing the effects of pollution. Only if we all get involved will we be able to save the Baltic Sea”, says Peter Wiklöf, CEO of Ålandsbanken.

With every transaction users make using the Baltic Sea Card, users can track how their consumption affects the environment and then have the opportunity to make up for their carbon footprint, and hopefully make different choices over the longer term.

Ad creative: Finnish Bank - How can the bank save the sea that couldn't breath

 

Picking up the Cannes 2017 design Grand Prix was clever use of space

A non-rectangular football field, created by property developers AP Thai for teenagers to play on in an over-populated area of Bangkok, won the coveted Cannes Grand Prix.

Ad creative: Non-rectangular football field so football can be played even when there isn't enough space

And even the film craft Grand Prix was awarded for a film that celebrates everyone’s abilities – Channel 4’s brilliant trailer for the Rio Paralympics in 2016.

Ad creative: Channel 4's Rio olympics advert

Ad creative: Channel 4's Rio olympics advert

 

One of the most awarded campaigns was “Fearless Girl”

This campaign has quite a back story.

The striking bronze statue placed on Wall Street by McCann New York to coincide with International Women’s Day.

It appeared with no warning on Wall Street in New York on March 7 2017 deliberately in juxtaposition with the iconic Charging Bull sculpture, itself a piece of guerilla art, placed within New York’s financial centre.

The Fearless Girl is shown squaring up to the bull, in a clear act of strength and defiance.

Unlike the bull, however, Fearless Girl began life as a marketing campaign.

Asset management company State Street Global Advisors created Fearless Girl to promote gender diversity on the boards of the companies they own on behalf of investors. They also wanted to promote one specific investment solution, SHE. SHE invests in companies where a significant majority of the leadership are women, at senior levels or on the board. Because, “organisations that have diverse leadership outperform organisations that don’t. That’s a proven fact”.

Ad creative: Fearless girl with iconic charging bull

 

And finally … Care Counts

In the project Care Counts, Whirlpool installed washers and dryers in schools to see how having clean clothes effects attendance rates. The insight was that kids from poor and homeless backgrounds with dirty clothes had lower self esteem and were more likely to stay away from school.

Ad creative: Care counts - clean clothes improve school attendance

Ad creative: Care counts -clean clothes improve school attendance

Ad creative: Care counts - clean clothes improve school attendance

The cynics might say that the banks, multinationals and governments are the very people can afford to do this sort of work. True.

But it also looks like a case not of just doing things better, but doing better things.

And whilst a self-congratulatory award show such as Cannes may not represent typical campaigns, or budgets, what it does achieve is to open our minds to new possibilities.

The client brief may not be to create an L-shaped football pitch, or a bronze statue. But as the interpretation of a brief, these experiences – and the potential they have to create a movement of their own – is aspirational.

If only we were superheroes

If only we were superheroes

Change your Luck blog series – Article 5

Guest author: Martin Hill, former International VP of Marketing, Epicor

time is a gift Until recently, I was in the kind of senior marketing job where time seemed to be the one thing that was impossible to enjoy. It was always moving so fast and there was never enough of it. Straight from meeting to meeting with barely enough time for proper planning before the urgency of execution, rinse and repeat. If only I’d known a superhero with the ability to turn back time.

Yes, of course we analysed performance, refined and reviewed tactics, but there were (and I suspect still are) lots of immovable objects that made the pursuit of excellence a challenge.

Looking back now, with the gift of time now firmly on my side, I can see a number of ways we wasted one of the most valuable resources we had. Time.

We procrastinated and hesitated.

We repeated mistakes and re-lived successes.

We were quick to execute and slow to stop. We were busy and we were achieving goals, but we weren’t excelling. We were human, not superhuman.

We were typical, I’m sure, of many marketing departments. Achieving a lot – but perhaps not always the right things – and with little time for reflection.


If only we were superheroes

I’m reminded of the 1978 Superman movie where Christopher Reeve flies so fast around the earth he reverses the world’s spin, turns time backwards and is able to prevent Lois Lane from dying in a car crash. Imagine being able to go back in time, make changes to your campaign and start again. You could repeat the process over and over until you knew exactly which version of the past performed the best, repeat it and then let time continue.

You’d definitely be a marketing superhero if you could, but it’s unlikely – however much I want to believe in superheroes (yes, I do still really want to believe it’s possible!).

So until Superman actually makes himself known to us, we’ll have to make the best use of the real time we have.

Known knowns and unknown unknowns

The problem of getting the best possible results from a campaign requires that we use time effectively and efficiently, speeding up execution and feedback so we can eliminate waste and improve performance. But just doing things right doesn’t always mean you’re doing the right thing. I’m reminded of this quote from Donald Rumsfeld (former US Secretary of Defense),

“There are things we know that we know. There are known unknowns. That is to say there are things that we now know we don’t know. But there are also unknown unknowns. There are things we do not know we don’t know.

Even the most experienced marketer can only develop and execute campaigns within the bounds of their own experience.

The known knowns.

Even if you know there are technologies and techniques that you have no knowledge of that may improve results, they can be inaccessible to you.

The known unknowns.

Chances are, there are marketing techniques, tactics and technologies of which you have no knowledge that may be equally promising.

The unknown unknowns.


Eliminating procrastination

Three things might really help at this point:

1. a way of identifying what you don’t know;
2. a way of prioritising their potential to improve performance; and
3. a way of acquiring the knowledge to implement them.

The challenge is the same, no matter how experienced or capable you or your team are. Your bar may be set low or high, but you are limited to your known knowns.

With an ever increasing pressure to deliver better ROI, no-one can afford to ignore the need to seek campaign performance improvement month on month, year on year.

By ring fencing part of your marketing budget (and resources) over a period of time, there may be a viable solution to this dilemma. Take £10k a month, for example (perhaps £5k for media, and £5k for the time to manage and create the necessary assets). And build an experimental framework. Every month, try running 2, 4, or more experiments. This experimental budget does not even need to touch on your main marketing activity, but will allow you to test like crazy, and find out exactly what combination of sign up forms, offers, calls to action, form fields (etc, etc) will give you the best ROI.

Rinse and repeat on a monthly basis.

All of a sudden, you have the real data needed to eliminate procrastination when managing multiple tactics, campaigns or programmes.

Suddenly it’s much easier to decide know what to do next. You know where the greatest improvement potential lies, and how to test for it.

And you always have next month to test something new.


Planning the right things right

Having the confidence to execute is half the battle.

Having access to a rich database of tests relating to almost every marketing tactic imaginable, each quantified with performance improvement potential derived from tests run by other marketing professionals, enables the creation of such a plan.

Everyone’s situation, programmes, audiences, technologies and tactic choices are different, but a rich database with thousands of potential performance improving tests can help anyone and everyone improve.

 

Eliminate procrastination and hesitation

Build a new plan. A framework with experimentation based in.

Don’t repeat your past, replicate someone else’s.

Don’t just succeed, excel.

Don’t be limited by your known knowns – explore your unknown unknowns.

We can’t promise to make you a superhero, but we can show you how to gain the gift of time.

IF YOU’D LIKE TO DISCUSS HOW TO TURN BACK TIME, GET IN TOUCH

OR, IF YOU MISSED MARTIN’S LAST BLOG POST “CAN YOU FIX THE ODDS?“, YOU CAN READ IT HERE.

 

Can you fix the odds?

Can you fix the odds?

Change your Luck blog series – Article 4

Guest author: Martin Hill, former International VP of Marketing, Epicor

I was able to enjoy watching a lot of sport this summer and even though I’m not a betting man, autumn sporting events like the Invictus Games, the UK Masters Golf, a whole host of Rugby Internationals, and of course, the upcoming Ashes, have started me thinking about the similarities between marketing and gambling- and how alike gamblers and marketers sometimes are.

However much we attempt to predict outcomes, carefully researching, planning, testing and measuring changes we make to our marketing plans, sometimes what actually happens is still unexpected.

Probable or improbable, we’re all trying to beat the odds.

Going for the long-shot

Some gamblers are lucky. So are some marketers. They place their bet or launch their campaign and win big. A big stake, long odds and a huge return. It’s a gambler’s dream. It’s a marketer’s dream.

Correction. It’s an inexperienced gambler or marketers dream.

Basing your success strategy on picking a long-shot is not an approach anyone with a track record of success would recommend. They’ll tell you that you have to do your homework and be smart, know when to bet and just as importantly, when not to.

They’ll also tell you that in marketing you can make your own luck.

Risk, reward and consequences

When you bet on the winner of a sporting contest you don’t just predict the outcome, you weigh up risk and consequences with the potential reward.

Check your own gut reaction to the opportunity presented by a million to one chance.

Imagine betting £1. Then imagine betting £100,000.

They feel completely different. The more you bet, the greater the risk, and the faster your heart rate. But the event you’re betting on and the odds of winning are the same. When does it start to feel risky? With a £10 bet? A £100 bet? £1000? More?

Everyone has a different perception of risk, and different circumstances that describe the consequences of losing your stake. What if you could place a stake within your risk threshold at the start and then choose to increase it during the contest as you see it unfold? What if you could test the outcome of choices during the contest before you change your bet? Hit the next shot down the line or try a lob? Shoot for the green or lay up?

Cut your losses or double-down?

Gamblers can limit their exposure by not betting any more when the result isn’t going their way, and “double-down” if it is. Fortunately for marketers, this is exactly the situation we enjoy.

The creative campaign development process will always require an investment of both time and money, but gambling on a marketing campaign isn’t necessarily an “all or nothing” proposition.

As investments increase, so does the consequence of underperformance. Testing the effects of both tactical and strategic choices during the campaign allows us to choose when to bet, and importantly when to stop.

In recent years, with the advent of new marketing technology such as the Ladder marketing tactic database used by results-focused agencies such as BH&P, A/B testing has become a lot easier. BH&P clients will typically run between 6 and 20 experiments every month, allowing them to ramp up or drop tactics almost in real-time. And whilst entire strategy pivots are less common, they are possible.

Can you pause the game?

Choosing what to test and when to test it, is where knowledge and experience pays off. It’s the reason why marketing technology on its own can’t help you fix the odds.

The best sports’ people know intuitively which choice is right for the moment. They can’t stop the game, test a couple of options, and then choose which one to take. They have to know instantly that the right shot is the passing forehand drive down the line, or the lay-up on a long par five in front of the water. It takes experience and practice.

For most marketers it’s just as difficult and impractical to stop the game. It can also make bad business sense to stop a campaign mid-flow. But you can test changes that are intended to improve performance during a campaign.

Yes, it’s still a gamble. But with the right tools, you can reduce the risks and improve the odds of this gamble quite dramatically.

Play the shot that’s already played

Marketers today have the opportunity to use the experience of others who’ve played the same shot.

You can identify which possible change to a campaign tactic is most likely to improve performance by selecting it from a database of previously executed experiments. It’s no guarantee, but it can improve the chances of improvement more than threefold.

This database, documenting past experiences of other marketers executing thousands of tests on their campaigns and tactics, combined with sound creative thinking from an agency partner that really understands this type of testing framework, is like having a personal coach and tipster at your side. It will help you become a better marketer, one who places more winning bets than those who play every shot as if it were the first time it had been played.

If you’re interested in finding out more, please contact me. I’d be delighted to help you explore the possibilities.

 

In the final blog of this series I’ll explore further how this data can help the most resource constrained, inexperienced or even high-performing marketing teams deliver exceptional results.
If you missed Martin’s last blog post “The joy of the happy accident, you can read it here.

 

The joy of the happy accident

The joy of the happy accident

Change your Luck blog series – article 3
Guest author: Martin Hill, former International VP of Marketing, Epicor


One of the best parts of my recent career break has been the opportunity to develop my (limited) skills with watercolour. It’s been a long time since I picked up a paintbrush and it isn’t proving easy. Satisfying, yes. Easy, no.

With the luxury of time I’ve been able to explore the vast resources of the web, absorbing advice from much more accomplished artists than me. The advice is varied but there are common themes.

Don’t just start, first prepare to start.

The first piece of advice is nothing to do with paint. The foundation of a great watercolour is a great drawing. Composition, scale, proportion, perspective. Not where a novice like me wants to focus when I have dreams of a great masterpiece.

Second is to experiment. Copy techniques of others, find what works and how, what fails and why. Use their experience to build an understanding of the fickle nature of watercolour. Learn to layer and blend colours into the hues and tones you need, learn when to paint and (importantly) when to stop.

Watercolour is also about happy accidents. The effects caused by water, pigment and paper reacting to each other in unplanned and unexpected ways. Learn when to intervene and when to hold back, learn when enough is enough.

Finally, it’s about volume. You have to be prepared to sketch and sketch and sketch, paint and paint and paint. Learn to move spontaneously and make quick decisions. Practice will make perfect, but there’s a lot of failure on the way.

Satisfying, yes. Easy, no.

Can you ever know enough?

Is it possible to practice every conceivable technique with every conceivable variation in hue and tone? Transparent and opaque colours, staining colours, wet-on-wet, wet-on-dry, textures, brush techniques, paper types. The possibilities are endless and knowing enough to master watercolour can take a lifetime.

Who has a lifetime? I’m too impatient, but the web allows me to absorb the experience of others. Collectively we’re spending multiple lifetimes practicing and sharing our experiences with each other. Someone, somewhere, has tried it before and posted the outcome online.

Use shared knowledge to reduce your fails.

As a novice I know the value of knowledge and experience. As a marketer I know it too. When you read back over the advice above, imagine I was talking about maximising the return on investment of your campaign.

Build a solid foundation, know your market, your audience, your value proposition, your positioning, your message. Know it before you start building campaigns.

The difficult part comes when you have to practice and experiment, learn what works and what doesn’t, what has the best outcome, what destroys the work you’ve done before. As an aspiring artist I may struggle to accept it, but the stakes are usually much higher in marketing than in watercolour painting. Failure can be much more costly.

This is where you need a way of accessing the collective knowledge and experience of other marketers who have gone before, and of those who are developing new technologies and techniques. Unfortunately, this knowledge has significant value to those who have it and quantified performance information is very often confidential, or expensive.

Making a breakthrough by accident.

The infinite variations in value proposition, positioning, message, market behaviour, communication channel preferences, cultures and tactics make it impossible to predict every campaign outcome perfectly. Some marketers are fortunate enough to guess correctly. They get their masterpiece, but it can often be a happy accident.

The fastest way to success is to test changes to campaigns quickly and efficiently. Get the first washes of colour down, then layer and blend to produce the best effect. Rather than acting randomly, using collective knowledge and experience to pre-select choices will massively increase your success rate.

The gift of experience.

Rapid performance improvement of campaigns demands the rapid execution of multiple tests. Time is the enemy, resources are scarce and ROI is king. If you could access the quantified past experiences of other marketers, and a ready source of knowledge to replicate their experiences, why wouldn’t you?

A database of qualified and quantified techniques to improve the performance of any and all of the tactics you are using would be invaluable. You would pre-select those that have worked for others, focussing time and resource where it has most chance of success.

It would be just the same as me watching videos of watercolour experts, wondering how they make it look so easy, and then deciding to try it myself. I’m absorbing a little bit of their lifetime of experience every time.

Time will tell if I ever produce a masterpiece. I’d settle for a few ‘wow!’s. Where’s your next ‘wow!’ coming from? What chance do you have of a ‘wow!’ campaign?



In my next blog I’ll explore the relationship between marketing and gambling, and ask ‘Can we fix the odds?’.
If you missed Martin’s last blog post Surfing the next wave, you can read it here.
Surfing the next wave

Surfing the next wave

Change your Luck blog series – article 2

Guest author: Martin Hill, former International VP of Marketing, Epicor

 

Lately I’ve had the previously unknown luxury of time – and with this came the opportunity to revisit some of the magnificent coastline, towns and villages in Devon and Dorset. I’ve been able to enjoy great weather and explore new things without the pressure of deadlines and targets to return to.

On my latest trip I was struck by the behaviour of the huge number of surfers also enjoying the conditions.

They sit on their boards patiently waiting and watching the surf, bursting into action to paddle furiously in pursuit of a wave, ride it as best they can and then return to repeat the process.

Surfing, it seems, requires a lot of patience, the right tide, and a certain element of luck.

Waiting for the perfect break.

Some waves they let pass, some they paddle to catch. Some they time perfectly, and some they don’t. Some they ride and on others they fall.

It struck me as I watched how similar their behaviour was to the marketers I had been working with for so many years. Watching and waiting for the next big marketing wave, the perfect break that will catapult their programme forward.

So how do you choose when to paddle, which wave to ride, or how long to ride it for? New marketing technologies, techniques and tactics are constantly emerging. Some are big and powerful, others tiny tweaks, but full of promise that never quite delivers, fading out as quickly as they rose up.

Learning from failure, yours or theirs.

Is it better to wait for the one big one and ride it right in, or to ride lots of smaller ones so you can jump on and off more quickly? Expertise and experience become really obvious when you have the opportunity to observe at leisure, from the cliff-top.

To maximise your surfing performance (the equivalent of your surfing ROI i.e. ‘maximise your return on effort invested’) it seems to me that it’s about riding as many of the waves you have the skill and energy to catch. Every now and then they can be bigger and more testing than you expected, but more importantly, it’s about knowing how to recognise a ‘fail’ so you can peel off and paddle back out for the next one.

You can tell a lot from those around you and can use their choices to influence your own. Wasting energy and time on waves you don’t have the skill to ride, or coasting to the shore on a wave with no break, brings little reward.

In the same way, marketers need to constantly look for new ways to improve their ROI. New tactics, new techniques, new technologies. It’s impossible to catch them all. Making good choices about which ones to paddle for, and which ones to let pass, is paramount.

Using the wisdom of the crowd.

There are surprising statistics that show how tough it is to make a change to a program or campaign that improves your marketing performance in
this blog
at Ladder.io (whose technology BH&P uses with every new client BTW),

“Noah Kagan, an early employee at Facebook and founder of AppSumo, only sees a 1 in 8 success rate. An industry study by VWO shows a 1 in 7 success rate. A study by Harvard Business Review pegs the failure rate at 80-90%.”

Having others around you with more experience and knowledge definitely gives you an advantage, helping to spot the right wave, encouraging you to go when maybe you wouldn’t, offering advice and guidance, watching and providing feedback to help you develop and control your own skills. There’s a lot to be gained from working with others who collectively spend a lot of time in the water.

This is huge. More marketing initiatives fail, than succeed. Period.

All resource constrained organisations, small or large, face significant challenges to improve their marketing.

Relying on your own innate capability and existing knowledge isn’t enough, particularly in the current build up to changes in the rules surrounding the use of prospect data. Your expertise in one technique won’t always translate into capabilities in others.

Coaching through failure to achieve success.

The collective experience of other practitioners, either individuals or agencies, are an invaluable resource. Used properly they can accelerate the improvement of your marketing programmes, campaigns and tactics.
Their reservoir of knowledge and experience can be used to quickly identify where the most significant improvements can be made, one after the other, to maximise marketing programme performance.
Knowing how different tactics, techniques and technologies work, what to try next, how to execute on the proposed changes, evaluating the results and quickly changing the plan in response are the attributes of a great marketing partner, and inevitably of a surf coach.

Fail fast to succeed sooner.

Maybe this summer has been the one where you donned the wet-suit, paddled out into the waves and started working with a surf-coach on improving your skills. Or maybe not!
Even if surfing is not your thing, hopefully the analogy rings true. If so, you’ll be inspired to think about experimenting more, testing and enhancing your marketing, to put you and your organisation on a path to improving not just marketing ROI, but business performance.

However you decide to go about this, you’ll build a better return on your investment of time and money, faster, if you can learn quickly from the successes and failures of others.

In the next article, I’ll be exploring why it’s a good idea to fail fast, and how you can turn this to your advantage quickly and (almost) without risk.

 

If you missed Martin’s first blog post Watching the World go by, you can read it here.
And if you’d like to request a free ideabook showing how BH&P can help you structure some tests to improve the ROI on your marketing, get in touch
Watching the world go by

Watching the world go by

Change your Luck blog series – article 1


Guest author: Martin Hill, former International VP of Marketing, Epicor

 

This year I decided to take a break from work and bring a bit more life into my work-life balance. I’m getting the time to relax and rediscover my natural curiosity and creativity, and to take a much more objective view of the pressures and practices of marketing that governed my career.

I’ve worked through a period of massive change since leaving university in the early 80’s. Watching from the outside magnifies how much the pressure, pace and pervasiveness of work has changed.

Even though I’ve disconnected from my previous job (surprisingly quickly!) I’m left with a ghost of myself in many social channels that continues to attract news, commentary and content relating to my interests in business, technology, communications and marketing.

Having the luxury of time.

Now I have the time to watch this world go by clear of the goals, targets, deadlines and pressures of a full time job, I have the luxury of time to consider the opinions, propositions, technologies and techniques being described by vendors, consultants, observers, practitioners and experts alike.

Time is the key. I now have it, where I didn’t necessarily have it before. Time was (and is) such a valuable commodity the question is always how to invest it most wisely. Hidden in the tsunami of news and opinion, research and promotional content are the gems that every marketer seeks.

Marketing techniques, tactics and technologies are developing so fast, the lifecycle of an effective programme is becoming shorter and shorter.

What works today might not work tomorrow.

Experienced marketers know they should be constantly looking to improve, enhance and even re-invent their programs and tactics to maintain and improve performance, but what, how and when? How do you chose experimentation over execution when time and budget are so constrained? It’s hard enough getting things done, let alone experimenting with improvements once they are up and running.

For a small enterprise, having a marketing programme that is working and delivering results is often an achievement in itself, attention and resources will then naturally move to other areas of the business that need attention.

For larger enterprises, having programmes in some markets or channels that work allows attention to shift to those where it doesn’t. Add more complexity with the dimensions of the buying cycle, changing buyer behaviour, the proliferation of communication channels, multiple products, markets and geographies, the varied expertise and experience of those who are responsible for the programmes, the shortening life cycle of the tactics deployed, the variety of specialised skills required to master marketing technologies, competitor behaviour, time and resource constraints, the need to improve return on investment…

It’s no wonder that most marketers need more time.

There’s no organisation that can afford to apply and evaluate every new technique, tactic or technology. You either don’t have the knowledge, the skills, the tools, or most importantly the time. If you have (or make) the time, how do you decide what to change, what to test, what to improve? Which programme, which campaign, which tactic?

Wouldn’t it be great if there was a way of slowing time and speeding up action; identifying opportunities prioritised according to their predicted improvement on ROI; and then acting on them quickly and effectively. A marketing time machine if you like. Something that allows us to build a plan that evolves dynamically, that we can pivot at will, and that guides organisations to better performance.

Stay with me on this … if the improvement plan is built based on emerging best practice, uses the knowledge of experienced practitioners, is specific and action oriented but can remain agile, it would eliminate hesitation and procrastination. It could (and should) direct the actions of an individual or team, and maximise the way they use their time.

I’m watching the world go by. I’m watching other marketers watching the world go by. For those that want to stop it but can’t figure out how, when or where, I think there’s a better way to maximise ROI.

The value of your investment may go up or down.

A bit like watching the stock market, the skill is picking those tactics and ideas most likely to go up and making it happen quickly, evaluating as you go so you can abandon those that don’t improve performance. No breakthrough technology, no over-hyped pseudo-methodology, no repackaging of old ideas with new names, no over-intellectual hypothesising. No snake-oil. Just a common-sense, practical approach to maximising return on marketing investment that will make life easier, more enjoyable, more productive and more effective.

In the next article I’ll look at how you become a more savvy marketing investor. One whose choices are more often the right ones and whose ROI is most likely to keep improving.
Marketing for non-profits

Marketing for non-profits

 The rules of engagement have changed

Charity fundraising just got harder

The key challenge for charity marketing today lies in balancing the need stand out from the pack, whilst complying with ever more strict data protection and fundraising rules.

 

In recent years, members of the public have expressed frustration over the lack of control many feel over how, and how often, they are approached with fundraising requests. We’ve all heard the story of the Olive Cooke, the 92 year old who committed suicide because of charities pursuing her for money. Charity marketing is implicated, with organisations such as Amnesty International, Save the Children and the Alzheimer’s Society insisting that their actions were not to blame for Olive’s death. But many of her family have accused the charities of exploiting the poppy seller, with allegations that she was receiving over 260 begging letters a month

 

Managing charity marketing and communications

Whilst perhaps Olive Cooke presents an extreme example, the Fundraising Regulator is acutely aware of the need to manage the situation carefully. The regulator is guided by the principle that it should be as simple as possible for individuals to manage their communications with fundraisers, and to prevent this type of scenario. In response to concerns, the regulator has developed a system to ensure people can register their contact preferences more easily with charities.

With the creation of the Fundraising Preference Service or FPS (planned launch in 2017), people will have the ability to opt out – and this will affect not just the general public, but also those people that have actively engaged your charity’s fundraising campaigns, but perhaps not opted in.

For those that already have a highly engaged supporter database, this is unlikely to prove a significant problem. Yet for those who rely on email and direct marketing to purchase databases and lukewarm data, there is a need to tighten up significantly on the way they market to their supporters.

Why charity messaging matters

We recently met up with Gillian McKay, Head of Charity and Voluntary Sector at the ICAEW (Institute Of Chartered Accountants In England And Wales), who had this to say:

“It’s never been more important that charities stand out with a message that will really engage supporters. These new rules that are coming in within the sector will have most impact on those that have not invested in, or understood, the rules of engagement. Charity marketing will only get harder“

 

Changes to the rules on data handling

Data protection rules are tightening up across the board, and charities are not the only sector under the spotlight. If we had chosen to remain in the European Union, brands and charities alike would now have less than two years to make sure they are compliant with the new EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) which was due to come into place in May 2018.

But does Brexit change this? “Those businesses who have yet to prepare for GDPR – and are hoping that Brexit will mean they don’t have to – are the ones likely to be caught out,” says Frank Jennings, a partner at Wallace LLP.

Any organisation with operations in the EU as well as the UK will certainly comply with the new rules. If nothing else, it will be impossible for compliance teams to manage multiple data standards within the same organisation – brands and non-profits alike. And the deadline for compliance with the new GDPR rules will come around before the deadlines for completing Brexit’s Article 50. With this in mind, complacency is not really an option.

The rules around the Fundraising Preference Service muddy the waters slightly, not least because charities will have to pay for the privilege of membership (albeit the proposed pricing will be proportionate). Gillian McKay’s view on this is clear. “Lots of charities already have very good levels of engagement. In general their budgets are smaller, and their accountability greater than in the commercial sector. While they won’t be able to change the rules, they can certainly prepare for the changes.”

 

Raising awareness

The first thing organisations that do not have this engagement level should do is raise awareness. According to John Mitchison, head of preference services, compliance and legal, at the Direct Marketing Association (DMA),

“Brands need to make sure everyone knows what is going on and the rules coming in and how they currently process their data. That can be an eye opener for lots of people.When the regulations come into effect brands will not get their doors kicked down straight away. But if you can show you spent two years doing what you could do comply that will be very helpful.”

The RNLI has taken a proactive approach, announcing in 2015 that it would switch to an opt-in model. Jayne Clarke, the charity’s head of marketing, says the move has showed her how important being ahead is and how long getting everyone in place can take. You can read more about this in this article, taken from Marketing Week: The RNLI on why it has become the first charity to switch to opt-in comms.

Charity marketing message

 

It’s all about the message

Since we launched in September 2014, the team at BH&P have worked on the principle “Idea everything, Media anything” – the premise that only with a big, bold, gutsy creative idea behind your marketing, will you actually change peoples’ behaviour.

Gillian McKay from the ICAEW echoed this principle, “those third sector organisations that are investing now – in systems, preparation and getting their message really clear – will see minimum impact. But the reality is that smaller charities may have neither the resources nor the expertise to prepare for the change, and some will struggle as the rules are tightened up”.

Gillian went on to explain that for those organisations without the internal resources, it will be vital that they choose to work with third parties that can help them articulate their point of difference, and that are doing everything possible to be compliant.

In recent years, many charities have turned away from fundraising emails and direct mail, and are increasingly looking to inbound activity and social media for both awareness and fundraising campaigns.

 

Make the most of Google for Non-profits

Google offers advertising grants of up to US$10,000 per month to charities and some other not-for-profit organisations, as well as a free, enriched version of YouTube.

BH&P runs inbound campaigns for a number of non-profits, including the national charity Crimestoppers, using the Google Ad Grant. For Crimestoppers, as well as generating a significant uplift in anonymous reporting, test programmes allow us to set realistic KPIs and benchmarks for future campaigns. Whilst the ad grant can be used only for search advertising, this is nonetheless a valuable way for charities to both maximise learnings and create supporter engagement with specific issues, whilst leaving their own media budgets untouched.

BH&P rolled out the launch campaign for stayenergysafe.co.uk, on behalf of Crimestoppers in September 2016. The Google Search campaign is currently running at a cost per click of 76p and clickthru rate (CTR) of 5.25% (that’s a 300% uplift compared to Google’s own benchmark for the charity sector). The associated Facebook campaign has also exceeded benchmark targets with a cost per click of 20p, and a CTR of 1.04% (more than 200% better than Facebook’s benchmark of 0.33%).

Google-for-non-profitsMicro-lending organisation, Kiva, shares its message using Google’s marketing tools to drive qualified online traffic to its website, and to fund loans that can improve thousands of lives in dozens of countries around the world. They use Google AdWords to raise awareness for their organisation and drive traffic to their website. They also leverage Google Maps as a visual way for donors to see the footprint of Kiva loans. Kiva recently ran a contest on YouTube inviting the community to create and upload videos to describe the value of what Kiva is offering.

 

The power of social media for charity marketing

Social media offers numerous opportunities for charities to create engagement with their supporters, to make more people aware of the work they do. Seth Godin describes social media as “the greatest shift of our generation”, and those charities that embrace this will be well-placed to thrive over the next few years.

A good example of a successful social media campaign is the #NTChallenge by the National Trust.

National Trust was one of the very first charities to connect with their audience effectively via Instagram. With more than 400 million people uploading 80 million photos a day, Instagram is now much more than the home of a thousand self-obsessed #selfies – it’s changed the way people around the world communicate, discover and travel. It’s become a powerful branding tool.

Marketing non profitsWith the #NTChallenge, National Trust asked followers to upload photos of National Trust protected buildings, landscapes and coastlines, choosing one winning image each week. Their Instagram following is now over 154,000, proving that the #NTChallenge was a great way to celebrate their existing community whilst also attracting new supporters. At the time of writing, Instagram has 35,756 posts with the tag #ntchallenge (though with the aside that you should choose your hashtag carefully – some of these are definitely more Nike than National Trust – #ntc is a Nike challenge tagged in 432,345 posts).

People in 2017 expect to self-select the brands and messages they wish to engage with – and this is a trend that is set to continue. Social media and search marketing will become ever more important as they support this shift, and charities would be wise to embrace the change.

 

A final word

Whilst it is true that some organisations may lose valuable existing members when new rules on data protection come in to place, those that are both creative and diligent now, with high levels of supporter engagement, will see little change.

Social media and inbound charity marketing will continue to offer new and exciting opportunities to engage with supporters. But for many, the biggest challenge will remain in converting awareness and engagement into tangible and financial support.

What is clear is that rules around data handling will continue to be tightened – in and outside of the EU – and that charities as well as commercial businesses all need to be aware of the potential impact, and plan accordingly.

All figures correct at time of publishing, 16/01/17.

 

To find out more about BH&P’s creative solutions for non-profits, get in touch.

You can also sign up to receive updates from the fundraising regulator on the launch of the Fundraising Preference Service (FPS) via this link.

Merry Christmas 2016

Merry Christmas 2016

A short Christmas message from all the team at BH&P

We’ve had a fantastic year, with lots to be thankful for.

This year, as well as running lots of successful campaigns for clients, we’ve had the pleasure of getting to know lots of fantastic people in the Reading business and arts community, as well as helping several charities and not-for-profit organisations. We also ran in the Reading Rotary Santa run a few weeks ago. We hope to do lots more of that this year!

business-finance-guide-home-pageHighlights of the year, work-wise, include the very successful launches of stayenergysafe for the national charity Crimestoppers, and of the interactive Business Finance Guide on behalf of the British Business Bank and ICAEW. We also created a fully integrated global growth campaign for software giant Epicor, in multiple languages.

Since our lovely Luci has gone and gotten herself engaged this weekend, we also need to say a very special Merry Christmas and congratulations to the newly betrothed couple, Luci & James.

If you’re interested in finding out a bit more, click here to see our Christmassy article on LinkedIn, with lots of information about what we’ve been up to over the last 12 months.

Have a wonderful Christmas, and a prosperous and productive new year.

 

PS Instead of sending Christmas cards this year, we’ve made a donation to the Humanimal Trust.

 

Launching energy theft reporting service on behalf of Crimestoppers

Launching energy theft reporting service on behalf of Crimestoppers

We’ve worked with the national charity, Crimestoppers, to launch the ground-breaking new service to reduce energy crime in the UK.

 

stayenergysafe-videoThe stayenergysafe service is a first of its kind and allows the public to come forward and anonymously report any suspicions or evidence of energy theft, either through the website or the dedicated number, 0800 023 2777.

An integrated campaign

We’ve worked with Crimestoppers throughout the project, offering a fully integrated creative service to launch the new stayenergysafe identity. We’ve created executions to target consumer and professional audiences, built a responsive website with its own secure portal, created a campaign launch video, a shortened launch video, implemented a multi-channel and contextual advertising campaign, and provided results based data analysis.

There are currently 150,000 cases of energy theft investigated every year. The charity aims to encourage more people to report cases of energy theft, a crime which has been known to have devastating effects following fires and explosions. There are horrific stories about energy theft on the website (link).

The launch

The public launch on Monday 19th September 2016 – which highlighted the real harm to individuals, property and lives due to energy theft – gained impressive media attention with publications in The Times, The Telegraph, The Sun, and a BBC Radio 2 interview, amongst others.

The new service received over 20 new reports of energy theft through its anonymous phone line and online reporting form within the first day, and we’re confident that the service will continue to encourage the public to report any concerns that they have about energy crime.

The website that we created for the campaign on energy theft can be seen at www.stayenergysafe.co.uk.

Challenging the norm

Challenging the norm

Our commentary on the Cannes Lions 2016

By Creative Director Jim Thomas, Summer 2016

 

A creative idea exists for one reason and one reason alone: to out think your competition.

Creativity isn’t something that comes from the sort of books that break things down into a formula. The 8 truths, or the 12 principles, or the 10 essential thoughts.

It comes from a different place. Understanding customers’ thinking. Then changing their behaviour. It’s thinking that comes from art schools and salesmen. Both know they have to stand out.

Award winning creative should do just this. There’s simply no point in being clever, if you don’t change the way someone thinks, and ultimately, how they act. And whilst Cannes 2016 felt rather more like a trade fair than a showcase of creativity, much of the work that was shared felt clever in a new way.

The overriding trend we saw was for work that showed, rather than told. Where the idea was so blindingly obvious, it made you wonder why nobody had thought of it before.

The best way to explain this is by example.

 

 

Some of our hot picks of award winning creative work

 

Breast cancer awareness in Argentina

Argentina breast cancer awareness

 

In Argentina, where there’s a catholic conservatism, women’s breasts and nipples are a sensitive subject on social networks. But men’s aren’t. So using a fat man with moobs, a breast cancer charity, MACMA, showed women how to carry out a breast examination.

This campaign also highlighted the fact that men can get breast cancer, in a simple, visual way.

 

How about giving people time?

 

For frazzled new parents who were up all night Carrefour offered  a special reward – time.

From midnight until 5am Carrefour opened a special online supermarket where mums and dads could do their shopping and get exclusive night-time discounts on baby products.

A benefit at last in sleepless nights!

 

Or how do you sell when your target market is too young to buy?

 

You can’t sell a pram to a baby. So how do you show parents that their baby will be in the most comfortable buggy on the market.

Easy.

Stroller built adult-sized buggies for parents to ride in and experience how comfy they were for their children.

 

Interrupting micro-moments

 

You can use an idea to interrupt the very moment a consumer is thinking about buying a product. This is what Maserati did in Germany.

Maserati knew that their car competed with the BMW 5 series, Mercedes E Class and the Audi A6.

Where do people go to find out more about a car? The internet. So Maserati bought the words “BMW 5 series”, “Mercedes C Class”, “Audi A7” and ‘test drive”.

When someone searched using these words the first ad they saw was from Maserati offering them a test drive from their home to the nearest BMW, Mercedes or Audi dealership.

You beat your competition. Your target market get a test drive in a Maserati before any German car salesman gets anywhere near them. Maserati got a 150% uplift in test drives and 10% more car sales.

 

Everyone loves dogs

 

People hate to think of dogs being put to sleep. An Auckland dogs’ home used a very simple everyday insight to tap into this and reduce churn.

There is a common saying that owners look like their dogs. This clever Aussie charity built a digital product integrating facial recognition software. They asked people to scan their faces, to see which dog best matched their face. They called this device ‘Doggleganger’.

And how could someone refuse a dog who matched them?

It helped empty the pound of dogs, gave people the chance to own a dog that matched them –and, importantly, and stopped the dogs’ home from looking like the bad guys who put healthy dogs to sleep.

By injecting fun into the very start of a potential adopter’s journey, this digital solution not only created differentiation from other dog adoption services, but has the potential to increase the conversion rate – in this case, the number of people that actually go on to adopt a dog.

 

Put viewers at the heart of the experience

 

What better way to show oppression than to show the freedom we have?

Asking people to give Amnesty access to their Facebook accounts let Amnesty show Facebookers how many countries they could be arrested in, tortured or killed.

Such innocuous things as having a drink, posting something anti government were tallied up to show how the world’s most controlling regimes would punish you.

 

We’ve chosen all these creative examples for one simple reason. They may all use the media of the moment, but at the core is one simple thought – an involving demonstration.

 

Thanks to BH&P‘s favourite CD, Jim Thomas, for writing this article on award winning creative.

Immediacy, “omnichannel”, creativity and brands

Immediacy, “omnichannel”, creativity and brands

Highlights from the Festival of Marketing #FoM14

Coke mini can campaignLast week, we spent two action-packed days at Tobacco Dock, and my mind is buzzing.

There were some strong themes that came out, and so I thought I’d share some of what we found out.

Theme 1 – Immediacy

I blew it. I admit it. I meant to publish this blog last Thursday, but work got in the way. The only person that’s really bothered about this (if I’m honest) is me. But for brands, the ability to respond quickly and appropriately is never more important than now.

Alastair Campbell (and other speakers, such as Mike Eames from Barclays) talked brilliantly about the impact that social media has had on reputation and “spin”. The ability to respond both honestly and very quickly is paramount. Hopefully the #FoM will post his talk on Youtube as it was brilliant (they haven’t done so at the time of posting).

In the spirit of immediacy, Alastair himself posted his script far more quickly than the Festival of Marketing – you can find the whole text here on his blog. – https://www.alastaircampbell.org/blog/2014/11/13/is-spin-dead-in-the-era-of-social-media/

Theme 2 – Omnichannel

I don’t know when the word “omnichannel” started to appear, but it was mentioned a lot last week, with the emphasis on providing a seamless experience for customers.

So what’s really changed? Omnichannel is on the face of it not much more than the rebranding of “integrated”. But we are in a world that is changing. A world where “integrated” quite doesn’t get across the idea that messages need to be both engaging and utterly consistent regardless of channel. As we move to a world where all television is in high definition, on demand, this is really exciting for marketing. By 2025 it’s predicted that we will have 48 million TV viewing options at any moment in time. For brands, this will require a fundamental shift, so a new word is probably appropriate. Is “omnichannel” the right word? We’ll see if people are still using it at #FoM15!

Theme 3 – Broken Marketing Paradigms

I attended a brilliant session by Coke’s Javier Sanchez-Lamelas, which I unashamedly steal from here, because it was so good.

1. Everything has changed

Marketers today are obsessed with media and channel, with NPS and social metrics. But that’s not what marketing is all about. Marketing is about engaging with people in new ways, creating emotional connections with brands that changes behaviour, and the subsequent changes in behaviour. He reminded the audience that everything Peter Drucker had to say is still true.

2. We haven’t seen this before

Javier talked about the explosion in channels and in consumer choice, and the impact this has on marketers. He showed us that this is not a new phenomenon, but that it happened before with the invention of the printing press, the radio, and then film and TV.

This change offers brands opportunities to create real connections with their customers (but will also spell the end for those who concentrate on media at the expense of creativity). This spells a move from “creative communism” (where brands pay media owners to air their content) to “creative Darwinism” (where poor marketing, that is not adaptable, will die).

3. Globalisation = Centralisation

As business becomes more global, Javier argued that this is a time to expand your reach, with cultural and local representatives all around the globe communicating and working together. If you try to centralise marketing or operations, or any other part of your business, you fail to recognise the many shades of light and dark, nuances and trends that impact on the success of your organisation.

He shared some of the fantastic global Coca Cola campaigns, pointing out the success of the Share a Coke campaign (from Australia), and the mini can campaign (from Germany).

4. It’s complex to predict the future

It’s not complex to predict the future. We have more metrics, more data, deeper understanding than ever before. We need to predict the future in order to stay ahead.

According to Javier “You must make sure the change inside your company is going faster than the change outside. If a marketer thinks they live in the future then they will not be able to progress their mind. Spend time talking to early adopters and kids if you want to be able to predict the future otherwise that’s a recipe for disaster. Without [external] guidance you’ll most likely be creating content for opportunities that no longer exist.”

5. Innovation is a central department

Javier’s point: “If you appoint someone as the head of innovation, then everyone else in the business thinks they can stop innovating”.

Point made!

 

This was the second Festival of Marketing – some brilliant content, and great speakers. There were a few organisational issues, particularly with The Digitals award ceremony, but overall we’ve come away with a lot of new ideas.